New security updates overtake jailbreak advantages.

There are just so many privilege escalation fixes in the latest iOS 12.2 update. I finally removed the jailbreak from my primary device and updated.  Privilege escalation is when an unprivileged or user process (like an app from the app store or even a web page*) gets root or even kernel authority.  This is when bad turns to worse because it can do and see anything with any of the device’s data or sensors.   Since even the big trusted apps have been caught tracking or stealing data, I simply couldn’t leave myself unprotected any longer.

I’ll still of course keep a development device jailbroken on 12.1.2 for all of the reasons. It was a wonderful experience, only slightly beta. I appreciate all the hard work by everyone in the scene. I think i am going hate seeing the home bar again the most.

* web pages are often sandboxed separately from the app itself. Some might argue that a webpage would first have to escape the sandbox before it could escalate privileges. this is true, but i would respond that sandbox escape is just another form of privilege escalation, only one level down. There are also over a dozen webkit fixes in this update.

Pilgrimage to the Internet Archive

Internet Archive

The offering I brought was nearly 100 lbs of technology from my childhood.  I met some amazing staff and volunteers (they even archive their employees). Even visited the blinking lights of their servers.  They archive even more then I knew.  More then web, old software and films, they even archive music and have an impressive collection (i found several rare or out of print artists and albums in their archive).

Amiga Offering to Internet Archive


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Hosted Unifi controller with Let’s Encrypt SSL take 2!

Unifi Dashboard with SSL

I visited this idea months ago, but for anyone who implemented it, it has been a nightmare.  Each subsequent Unifi controller update broke the https in new and exciting ways.  After remaining a very squeaky wheel with Ubiquity support, they’ve pushed out a version that should permanently resolve the problems. They even made promises of native Let’s Encrypt support.  All this will prove true of false with time, but for now i wanted to share my working procedure for Unifi controller version 5.9.32.

This solution required me to become more familiar with Java’s keytool then i would have otherwise.  Unifi has a hardcoded keytool path and password, don’t change that (thanks Corey F @ubnt). i don’t think alias matter, but they must be consistent.  I used mykey.  We start by generating a key and a code signing request for our domain.  For permissions reasons, we will want to do this as root. . .
cd /var/lib/unifi
keytool -genkeypair -alias mykey -keyalg RSA -keysize 2048 -keystore keystore -dname "CN=custom.domain.name" -storepass aircontrolenterprise

Now we export the csr file we will give to Let’s Encrypt.
keytool -certreq -alias mykey -keystore keystore -file custom.domain.name.csr -ext san=dns:custom.domain.name -storepass aircontrolenterprise

Now we run the interactive certbot script to prove the domain is actually yours before they hand out a cert.  Follow the instructions you can use DNS or hosting a file to verify.
certbot certonly --manual --csr custom.domain.name.csr

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Played with PoisonTap network hijacking tool

Poison Tap in Action

@SamyKamkar made an impressive and terrifying tool.  This simple USB device steals your cookies, poisons your cache, and even persists a web backdoor.  On a locked machine no less!  It depends much on the trust that our computers take for granted.  Trusting a USB device is not up to no good.  Trusting the local network not trying to confuse. We must reexamine this trust going forward.  It didn’t take long to get it up and running, however once you do, you can spend hours tinkering.  (i was working to combine it with @mubix‘s work here)

I am also delighted to have my first Raspberry Pi as a USB device rather then host.  it is certainly exciting to create some new doodads using this dangerous toolkit.

UPDATE

I have since made a version without the cache attack.  I completely failed to steal the poisontap visuals, but TheCodePlayer offers a delightful matrix animation.  next step is to man in the middle ssl too.  I’m turning it into a device that logs everything while connected, but doesn’t persist.