Diablo III a lesson in system requirements. . .

Diablo III logo
When I preordered Diablo III, I knew it required an internet connection.  I figured this was for additional online content, updates, etc.  What i was not prepared for was the harsh reality that if battle.net is down, i cannot play.  This is not a MMORPG, this is a single player game and the entire game is stored on my laptop.  Years ago, i remember playing Diablo II on my laptop at school, airport terminals, and even in airplanes.  (these were the days before in flight wifi)  It is unfortunate that Blizzard’s fear of piracy has lead them down a path of poor user experience for their paying customers (in this case prepaying).  Better still is the fact that it is very doubtful that this will even stop piracy of the game.  Already users of bootlegged versions of this game are able to play without purchase, authorization, or even network connectivity.

The truth is that today is launch day, and there are undoubtably piles of problems to be resolved with the game.  Hordes of users log on to play, the servers can get overwhelmed.  I just feel that users should be able to enjoy most of the game without connecting to battle.net.  Game makers need to understand that sometimes people want to play offline. My favorite example, what can you play when the internet is down?  The list is getting shorter every year.  Wake up Blizzard.  If you cannot provide an excellent user experience with copy protections, you may want to rethink your priorities.  Is it more important to continually infuriate customers or temporarily frustrate pirates?

EFF wins DMCA exemptions!

Jailbreaking, DeCSS, and more LEGAL!  read all about it.


“When one jailbreaks a smartphone in order to make the operating system on that phone interoperable with an independently created application that has not been approved by the maker of the smartphone or the maker of its operating system, the modifications that are made purely for the purpose of such interoperability are fair uses.”

“The Copyright Office recognizes that the primary purpose of the locks on cell phones is to bind customers to their existing networks, rather than to protect copyrights.”

Even Burning Man has fine print!

Did you know that the Burning Man Organization owns the copyright to all pictures taken on the playa?  they do.  Did you read the fine print when you bought your ticket?
Why would BMO—the organizer of an “an annual experiment in temporary community dedicated to radical self-expression and radical self-reliance”—undermine speech and creativity like this? BMO claims that the terms in the Burning Man ticket agreement are necessary to protect Black Rock City’s unique culture and the privacy of its participants. Furthermore, BMO points out that the limitations are rarely enforced and they only claim copyright if the photos are used in a way BMO doesn’t authorize. By claiming copyright in all photographs taken at the event, BMO can use the streamlined “notice and takedown” process enshrined in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) to quickly remove unapproved photos from the Internet.
read more from eff here: